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of the fiscal cliff negotiations. the mortgage interest deduction. government spending on this will reach $100 million by 2014, making it the third largest tax break on the books. who does it help? 41 million people. the most recent irs data showed that 41 million people claimed this deduction on their 2010 tax returns. the tax policy center says it tends to benefit upper middle class families the most. these bars show income in the circles the average savings. for those with incomes of less than $40,000 a year, their savings is $91, look at the people who make $250,000 and more. their average savings is about $5500. this benefits people most on both coasts and cities like chicago, with higher property prices, and we watch the fiscal cliff negotiations closely for what could happen next to this tax goody next year. >> here's the question i'm hearing people ask, if we go off the cliff here, how big a hit will we take on taxs? stand by, because i'm about to give you the closest answer i possibly can. to help me with that is laurie montgomery, she is the fiscal policy reporter for the washington
of spending cuts so far. and unless there is, there's a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. >> a reporter asked senate majority leader harry reid about speaker boehner's comments. >> he says that democrats have got to get serious about cuts, spending cuts. where is the disconnect then? >> i don't understand his brain, so you should ask him. okay? >> and, of course, another day more republicans dumping grover norquist. among nebraska and is iowa republicans, most of them told the world herald this week they could support a broad budget agreement, even if the deal ends up including higher tax revenues. i won't have a problem with letting those tax rates go up, representative mike simpson said to reuters. but new york congressman chris gibson found the most creative way out of his relationship with grover. his spokesman released a statement reading, the congressman signed the pledge as a candidate in 2010 for the 20th congressional district. carson gibson doesn't plan to re-sign it for the 19th congressional district, which he now represents. the pledge is to your constituents
some of wednesday's events regarding the fiscal cliff. tax increases and spending cuts that will go into effect unless congress acts. first, a bloomberg government form. in an hour, president obama speaks to ceo's at a business roundtable. followed by a news conference with john boehner. several live events to tell you about tomorrow morning. talking about housing issues and the agency's budget. here on c-span at 10:00 eastern. on c-span two, 9:00 a.m. eastern, a news briefing at the pentagon. also, a senate commerce subcommittee on the impact of hurricane sandy and transportation systems in the northeast, on c-span 3 at 10:30 a.m. eastern. >> we have had these explosions of knowledge in medicine but we have not coordinated care. all of these have some in the cracks that they are as harmful as the disease is treated. you have to ask, are we hurting people overall on a global level that's what are we doing sometimes? now we have got the report saying 30% of everything we do may not be necessary in health care. when we step back, 30% of all the medications we prescribe, the procedures
, we should actually have them not leave washington until they fix the fiscal cliff. at least let's fix the fiscal cliff and make sure that american families aren't faced with possible larger tax bills come january. >> wouldn't it just make you feel better if you didn't feel the real reason we'll get a fiscal cliff resolution, whether it's a little tinkering or something bigger, wasn't because they actually wanted to be home on christmas? >> i think that they absolutely should try to get this done. i certainly don't think they should go home before the situation is resolved. but i also think that when you are looking at what kind of congress we want, we want a responsive congress. we want a congress rooted in american communities, not inside the beltway. >> look, you just want mondays and fridays off, too, and your trying to make the argument to the national review as to why that is better. >> americans want their leaders to work, period. >> thanks to both of you. we appreciate it. of course, we want all your feedback. >>> next, the billionaire software tycoon john mcafee is wanted in t
the state of kentucky. senator paul, welcome, as always. i want to ask you about the fiscal cliff, the state of play. there's revenues on the table. there's tax rate increases on the table. i don't know if there's spending on the table. what's your thinking prigt now? >> that it's a really, really bad idea to raise taxes. if you want your economy to grow, you should do the opposite. we have to cut taxes. that's how i'd fix the economy. leave more money in the private sector. the president is adamant about raising taxes and he's dead wrong. >> there are some people saying we need a deal to avoid a huge tax increase but year end that would throw us into recession. just a thought, would you compromise in terms of let's say a smaller tax rate increase -- let's say the top rate goes to 37% instead of 40%, maybe the threshold goads es to $500,000 $750,000 rather than $250,000? does that interest you? >> no. but what about means testing for entitlement. why don't we say the rich get less social security and they pay more for their medicare? it meets the president's animus that we must get more mone
months of hearing about the fiscal cliff, there are no signs of a compromise plan. let's bring in senior congressional correspondent miss dana bash. dana? republicans say president obama's opening offer is, you know, all take and no give here. do they feel like the president is wasting their time? >> reporter: yes. they do. and, you know, a lot of times when we see this kind of toing and froing in public, don, it masks what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to
right now. >>> our country will be heading over the fiscal cliff that we ourselves dug and put in our way. it's the set of automatic spending cuts and tax hikes that can only be averted if our nation's leaders are able to display bear bones competence and middle school-level maturity. so is there a deal? >> there's, of course, no deal. >> of course! is there a prospect for a deal? >> there's not a prospect for a deal. >> of course! but the ongoing talks. >> there aren't even very many talks going on. >> you're killing us! give us something. >> but for the first time, there are numbers on pieces of paper from both sides. >> numbers on paper! >>> good morning. it's wednesday, december 5th. welcome to "morning joe." live in the nation's capital. this is exciting. and you know, i said, let's do a show from washington, d.c., because they get so much stuff done there. it's like silicon valley. and going there when steve jobs was really bringing apple to the forefront -- >> a happening place. >> it is. it's where things happen. that's why we're here, steve rattner. >> washington is the place
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7